March 10, 2022 Animation.
Disney and Pixar’s “Turning Red” introduces.
The movie is currently streaming on Disney+.
Turning Red,” Pixar’s newest feature picture, is the first to be directed entirely by a woman, with Domee Shi (who previously directed the Pixar short “Bao”) taking the reins.

 

Meilin “Mei” Lee, a 13-year-old Chinese-Canadian girl on the verge of adolescence, stars in “Turning Red.”

Mei’s ancestors have a mysterious bond with the red panda species, which she learns about one morning when she awakens from a nightmare to find herself changed into a massive red panda.

her parents are aware of the impending transformation, yet they respond in completely different ways.

Mei’s network of friends supports her extraordinary ability and loves her no matter what.

Characters.

Mei Lee (voice of Rosalie Chiang).

a confident, goofy 13-year-old struggling between becoming her mother’s obedient daughter.

Mei is the film’s leading lady. a newbie plays a 13-year-old girl growing up in Toronto, Canada, who is both Chinese and Canadian.

Mei’s mother has great expectations for her, and she wants to live up to them, but she is also in the throes of puberty,

which brings with it a slew of hormones and emotions.

Mei awakens from a nightmare one morning to discover that she changes into a massive red panda whenever she experiences extreme stress or enthusiasm. “Turning Red” follows Mei and her pals as they try to make sense of her unusual circumstances.

And, as if the changes to her hobbies, relationships, and physique weren’t enough, she “poofs” into a big red panda anytime she gets too enthusiastic (which is often)!

Ming (voice of Sandra Oh),

her caring, if not slightly pushy mother, was hardly far from her daughter, which is an uncomfortable reality for the adolescent.

Mei’s mother, Ming, has the greatest of intentions for her daughter, but by vocalizing every flaw Mei has, she risks creating an unachievable standard for Mei to follow.

Ming and Mei have a strong relationship; they are not just mother and daughter, but also closest friends.

When Mei enters adolescence, however, Ming clenches her fists even more to maintain control over her daughter, whom she perceives to be changing and maybe slipping away.

Ming’s helicopter parent nature goes into overdrive whenever Mei’s red panda skills activate (her ancestors were formerly close to the species).

Oh is most recognized for her portrayal of Dr. Cristina Yang on “Grey’s Anatomy,” as well as other roles.

Jin (Orion Lee).

Jin, Mei’s father. Jin’s gentler attitude counteracts Ming’s ferocity.

Jin uses his red panda talents to guide Mei and is more confident in her capacity to make her own decisions than Ming is.

Priya (Maitreyi Ramakrishnan).

Mei’s best friend is Priya, a young Indian-Canadian girl.

She is the most laid-back (and presumably least bothered, based on her facial expressions) of the four pals,

yet she shares their enthusiasm for things like 4*Town, the boy band Mei and her friends like.

Miriam (Ava Morse).

Another of Mei’s closest pals is Miriam.

Miriam, who is tomboyish by nature, is always there for Mei, especially when she is overcome by her powerful emotions or the revelation that she has transformed into a large fuzzy beast.

Ming, Mei’s mother, becomes skeptical of Miriam, believing that Miriam has a negative influence on

Abby (Hyein Park).

Mei’s friend circle is completed by Abby, who is voiced by Hyein Park.

She has a wild energy and exudes confidence and audacity.

Abby, a Korean-Canadian, isn’t afraid to be assertive, and she does everything she can to support her friends.

Park works at Pixar as a storyboard artist, and in “Turning Red,” she makes her voice acting debut.

4*Town – Robaire (Jordan Fisher) & Jesse (Finneas O’Connell).

4*Town is Mei and her friends’ favorite boy band, and its songs were composed by Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell.

Finneas, Jordan Fisher (“To All the Boys: P.S. I Love You”), Josh Levi (“Friday Night Lights”), Grayson Villanueva, and Topher Ngo provide the voices for the band members. They do their own singing, too.

Summary.

Even the idea gives me pause: a quirky Asian girl morphs into a gigantic red panda whenever she gets aroused. That makes evaluating the new Disney/Pixar picture “Turning Red” (on Disney+ March 11) all the more difficult.

Because that’s the premise of this occasionally touching but the erroneous coming-of-age film, which straddles the line between accurately portraying a Chinese family, warts and all, and indulging clichés.

Rosalie Chiang’s character, Meilin Lee, is a regular 13-year-old girl: She dances, has male crushes, and hangs out with a group of odd but devoted pals who share her adoration for 4*Town’s glossy-lipped members. She’s also a Chinese Canadian who, in 2002, was residing in Toronto, where her family runs a temple.

She assists her demanding mother, Ming (Sandra Oh), and attempts to be the perfect daughter, even if it means suppressing her own needs and opinions in the process. When she goes through her changes — not the menstrual type, but the panda kind — this gets a lot more difficult.

“Turning Red,” directed by Domee Shi, excels best in character writing and design.

Mei has that familiar middle school cool geek attitude – she’s creative and confident, and she has a flawless report card to boot.

Miriam, a tomboy skater girl, Priya, and the wonderfully feisty Abby make up a quirky trio of gal buddies who serve as Mei’s emotional safety net.

Ming maintains a remarkable mix between tyrannical and adoring, discarding Mei’s friends and hobbies but yet chasing her at school to feed her steamed buns.

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